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20120901
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further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize rhis columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rate short trem interest rates are already essentily at zero, the fed mov
a lot of the same problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is really, as you say, well, if you give us, let's say, debt relief to greece, well, then you can be pretty sure that other european countries that also have received bailouts will want the same treatment. so what you're trying to do in europe, in minute, is really to-- i believe that ultimately debt relief will have-- further debt relief will have to be given to greece by the euro area governments. but they're really trying to make the road to that so arduous and so terrible that nobody else in europe will really want to go down that ute. an as we'r looking at greece today-- which has a cumulative decline in g.d.p. of, you know, close to 20% and still dro
"brown v. board of education." think of cases that have interpreted the constitution of the united states around equal rights and so when we talk about the importance of the presidency it's certainly about the economic issues of that nature. but this could have impacts for hundreds of years. >> i do have to ask this question. there's going to be 28 women paraded on the stage tonight to talk about the power of the republican party. >> we only have 17% of women in congress. we only have 17 women senators, we only have six governors who are women we still have a very long way to go and when the house of representatives is having a hearing about access to birth control and the first panel is devoid of a woman, women women's voices aren't being heard. >> ifill: thank you both, one of those women is on the floor right now, that's congresswoman nidia valasquez of new york. >> i am proud to speak to you as a hispanic american. as a proud latina and a puerto rican. (cheers and applause) from being the first in my family to attend college to becoming the first latina to chair a full congressional c
the united states? >> indeed, there is. the arctic sea ice essentially is a big reflector of solar energy during the summer and that keeps the arctic cooler than it normally would be. it acts like an air conditioner for the earth's climate system and that helps not only keep the arctic cooler but also the globe as well. and it's basically a safe for heed that comes in at the equator, gets transported to the north you lose the heat in the arctic. and that transfer of eat from the equator to the poles, that essentially helps set up things like the jet stream, prevailing winds, weather tracks. so as we start to lose the ice cover and warm up the arctic, essentially that's changing the balance between the kuwaitor and the poles and that will shift things like storm tracks and the jet stream and that will change weather patterns and we've seen some evidence of that already and we expect to see more in the future, although we're still in the early stages of understanding that completely. >> suarez: you know, it's a commonplace in stories written about what's happening in greenland, what's happe
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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